9.03.2019

Science Fiction = science + imagination


When I'm inspired to write a science fiction story, it's almost always because of something I've seen or read in the news. Climate change, new technology, an immune virus, or a controversial change in laws. This is the spark that changes the future, and I wonder where it will take us.

Over a century ago, much of science fiction was written about the far future (500 years or more in the future). It was difficult to see humans in space or how fast the world would change. The genre has evolved, and these days, much of it is written about the near future (50-100 years in our future). We know how fast things can change, and it's frightening.

The rocket of humanity has blasted off, and most people don't see a bright future. Dystopian books are popular, but is this because so many folks have accepted our dismal tomorrow or because they're looking for solutions?

By exploring what is logically possible through science fiction, we can seek out solutions to problems happening in society right now. We may not have the technology or a society which demands that change, but it may inspire people to become scientists or sociologists. Imagination is just as important as science.


16 comments:

  1. "Dystopian books are popular, but is this because so many folks have accepted our dismal tomorrow or because they're looking for solutions?" ... This is a chilling thought.

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    1. Isn't it, though? I do hope we're looking for solutions.

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  2. I like to think that dystopian books remind us of what could go wrong and inspire us to do things to prevent such dystopias.

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    1. I hope they are inspiring just that. I think everyone is hoping for a Star Trek future!

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  3. I call my Fireseed series post-dystopian: a time after an apocalypse when the world is showing signs of new life. Experimental new ways of living, while still perilous. To me, that’s more interesting than straight up dystopian. That said, I will read any well-written sci-fi!

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    1. Me too! I do like the post-dystopian idea. Gives hope!

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  4. I love reading dystopian books. Maybe the attraction is because it takes us back to basics?

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  5. I think it does inspire people to consider careers in science and look for ways to create a better future. I am an English Education major who didn't believe I was good atscience - but I always told my daughter's how exciting science is, had them read and watch plenty of SF, and now they are both becoming engineers because they want to create environmentally friendly solutions for our future.

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    1. That's awesome! My son, too, is really into STEM. I have great faith in this current young generation to be the ones that start us on the road to a better future. :)

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  6. Agh. My phone autocorrected daughters to have an apostrophe. Sorry about that.

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  7. "Because so many people have accepted our dismal tomorrow or because they're looking for solutions?" I hope it's the latter, but I don't know. All I know is that when I write dark science fiction it's usually to warn people against a dark tomorrow hoping it will motivate them to prevent it from happening. Not to mention to give them some entertainment at the same time!

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    1. Yes, the entertainment part is just as important!

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  8. I think people like them because the bad guys usually lose and people want to see that.

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